Ep. 38 Amazon Reforestation, a Remote Mission, and Baby Crocodiles | Twig Science Reporter

Updated : Jan 16, 2020 in Articles

Ep. 38 Amazon Reforestation, a Remote Mission, and Baby Crocodiles | Twig Science Reporter


On this week’s news update– a project to replant trees
in the Amazon rainforest, a team of scientists
prepares for a remote mission and San Diego Zoo
welcomes some tiny new arrivals! First up– the Amazon rainforest
in South America is home to
some incredible animals, and that’s not the only
amazing thing about it. The trees here provide 20 percent
of all the oxygen on our planet! Which is why it’s often
called the ‘lungs of the Earth’. Unfortunately, large areas
of the Amazon rainforest are being cut down. These images show areas
where the rainforest has been cleared to make way for farmland. But conservationists
are trying to tackle the problem. A new project aims to replace
many of the trees that have been lost. This is called reforestation. The plan is to plant
73 million new trees by 2023. Next up– imagine spending months
in one of the most isolated and freezing places on Earth. This is the Concordia Research Station
in Antarctica. This harsh environment
makes it a unique place to collect information
on a range of subjects. From climate change
to space travel! Every year a new team of scientists
arrives at the station, and the latest team
has now been selected. This includes a medical doctor
who will carry out experiments on the rest of the crew
to test how they cope in these extreme conditions. It’s hoped this information
will help astronauts prepare for missions to other planets! And finally,
it’s Animal Watch. This is the moment a tiny crocodile
hatched at San Diego Zoo in the USA. It’s one of eight baby crocodiles
that recently hatched at the zoo. They’re called
West African dwarf crocodiles, the smallest species
of crocodile in the world! In the wild,
they usually live in the rainforest swamps
of West Africa. All crocodiles are specially adapted
to live in water and on land. They’re cold-blooded animals,
so they need to lie in the sun to warm up their bodies,
and return to water to cool down. These little ones
are the first of their kind to hatch at San Diego Zoo,
but visitors won’t be able to see them until they’re older
and a bit bigger! That’s all for this week
we’ll see you next time!

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